TSD (Knoxville) » 30th Annual EII

30th Annual EII

EII logo
 
30th Annual EII
Educational Interpreters Institute
 
Pearls of Wisdom:
No Grit, No Pearl
 
A TSD & TRID Virtual Collaboration
 
acet tn trid EII RID tsd
 
 
Information about our Conference
 
THE OFFICAL LANGUAGE OF THE CONFERNECE IS ASL: If you require accommodations for the conference, please contact [email protected] by June 10th, 2022.
 
TSD NON-DISCRIMINATION POLICY: Tennessee Schools for the Deaf does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, disability, or age in its programs and activities and provides equal access to the Boy Scouts and other designated youth groups.
 
TRID ACCESSIBILITY & NON-DISCRIMINATION STATEMENT: TRID fosters an environment of mutual respect and inclusion that is free from harassment, bias, and discrimination based on race, color, religion (creed), gender identity or expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, martial status, sexual orientation, or military status. Accordingly, the TRID conference welcomes an audience of novice to experienced interpreters, interpreting students, and members of the local and state Deaf community. 
 
TRID Sponsor, content level: TRID is an approved CMP Sponsor for Continuing Education Activities. This Professional Studies Program for EII is offered for 1.35 CEUs through TSD at the Content Level: Some for working interpreters and students from June 22, 2022 to June 25, 2022. Registrants of EII are eligible for an additional .6 CEUs which may be attainable through TRID's workshops presented on 6/25/22. Registrants do NOT have to pay twice for 6/25. More information on TRID registration will be sent out once TSD receives your registration for the EII conference. 

Refund Policy: Refunds ARE available through June 13th by emailing [email protected].
 
Our Workshops
 
"So You Want to Be a Licensed Educational Interpreter in Tennessee?"
Wednesday, June 22, 2022, 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM (EST)
Presented by Heather Lawson
(.25 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some)
heather
 
Description: In the last couple years the rules for educational interpreting in Tennessee have been consolidated into other parts of the code leading to confusion about their status. Additionally, the process of completing the licensure process has changed multiple times adding to the confusion. Let's take a walk through the rules governing educational interpreting and how to get a license in Tennessee from licensure requirements to how to complete the application for the license.
 
Heather Lawson (CI/CT, Ed: K-12, MCP) holds a bachelor's degree in Interpreting from Maryville College and has a Master's degree in Deaf Education: Educational Interpreting from the University of Tennessee. A majority of her interpreting career has been focused on educational interpreting, with over 10 years of experience in K-12 environments. She currently works at the Tennessee Schools for the Deaf serving all three campuses as Admissions Coordinator, Registrar, Attendance Supervisor, Student Information Systems Specialist, Licensure Administrator, and System Administrator for several information and assessment systems. Heather enjoys living on an old farm in Jefferson County with her husband, father-in-law, and two cats and running an Etsy store selling her crafts.
 
"Modern ASL - Slang and Cultural Signs"
Wednesday, June 22, 2022, 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM (EST)
Presented by Briella Diaz
(.25 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some)
birlle
 
Description: Have you ever seen your students/clients use a sign that you're unfamiliar with? Have you ever wanted to 'update' the signs that you use to relate to your students/clients better? This is the workshop for you! Learn signs that may be new to you and how to translate them into English (and vice versa) while also learning the linguistic roots of those words. 
 
Briella Diaz is the current Deaf Mentor/Parent Advisor Program Coordinator at Tennessee Schools for the Deaf. She hails from Gallaudet University with a bachelor's degree in Bilingual Outreach and Linguistics with a focus on Early Childhood Education, with a Graduate Certification in Infant, Toddler, and Family Studies nearing completion. Educating and working with families and professionals about Deaf and Hard of Hearing children has been a passion of hers for years. She enjoys video games, 90's-2000's music, going on walks, and reading deaf cultural books. 
 
"Audiology Guide to the HOH Student"
Thursday, June 23, 2022, 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM (EST)
Presented by Crista Froeling, Au.D., CCC-A
(.25 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some)
crista
 
Description: Are you aware of current assistive hearing technology used in educational environments and social settings? This presentation will focus on students' hearing devices (functioning and care) and FM/DM/Remote mic technology, and to provide educational interpreters a better understanding of various levels of deafness. It will also help them learn how to trouble shoot simple problems with technology.
 
Crista Froeling, Au.D., CCC-A, has worked as a Special Schools/Educational Audiologist at Tennessee Schools for the Deaf for 21 years. She supports educational teams across Tennessee as a member of the Statewide School Support team. Crista services children birth to 22 to include hearing assessments, (re)screenings, loaner equipment (FM/DM systems), classroom observations, recommendations, and consultations with school systems for FM/DM use and auditory processing issues with hard of hearing students. She is also an ECHO trainer and works with area and migrant Head Start programs.
 
"Using Classifiers to Express Concepts in ASL Related to Skills of a Trade"
Thursday, June 23, 2022, 1:00 PM - 3:30 PM (EST)
Presented by Bryan Bowen & Anna Austin
(.25 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some)
bry anna
 
Description: Would you like to know more about how to incorporate vocabulary from English into ASL by using classifiers in the trade area of home construction and automotive? Participants in this workshop will learn how to apply information from this workshop when interpreting in specific trade. They will also be able to link concepts from English to ASL by using classifiers. 
 
Bryan "Bry" Bowen currently works as an ASL Services Specialist at Tennessee Schools for the Deaf in Knoxville. He obtained a bachelor of science degree from the University of Louisville in American Sign Language Interpreting Studies and a Master's degree in Sign Language Education from Gallaudet University. Bryan is married to Emily and has three children: Will, Grace, and Sophia. He has two dogs, a cat, plus a grand horse. His hobbies include golfing, fishing, hunting, and football. Bryan graduated from KY School for the Deaf. He is also an assistant football coach at TSD.
 
Anna Austin became deaf at the age of 5 due to her father's exposure to Agent Orange during his tours in Vietnam. She joined Tennessee School for the Deaf at the age of 7. As she grew, so did her signing skills. Anna did not graduate from TSD; however, in 2016, she took the HiSET Exam (formerly known as GED). Anna went straight to Pellissippi State Community College then transitioned to the University of Tennessee where she is currently a Junior, majoring in Educational Interpreting with the goal of earning her Master's in ASL Education. Anna works full-time at TSD and works at her alma mater as an ASL Services Lab Specialist. She is active in the Deaf community as a board member of Knoxville Center of the Deaf, and as the president of the Southern Baptist Conference of the Deaf. Anna also serves as the secretary for the Tennessee Association for the Deaf. She is happily married to Tony for 29 years and has three children: Nicholas - 26, Isaac - 21, and Gabriella - 17. 
 
Keynote: "Facilitating Communication or Facilitating Interactions? Defining the Role of the Interpreter"
Friday, June 24, 2022, 6:00 PM - 9:30 PM (EST)
Presented by Heather Lawson
(.3 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some) 
heather
 
Description: Interpreters enter assignments often being the only participant with an understanding of both sides of the conversation. We determine our role and responsibilities in each setting and situation based on several guiding documents, generally unknown to the participants. We function autonomously and generally with minimal supervision, having very little direct accountability for our work. While this may be an "easy" way to function, is it ethical or right? We will dive into the variety of tools and resources interpreters have to work as a team with the discourse participants to define their role and responsibilities. In the end, are we facilitating just the communication, or the whole interaction event?
 
Heather Lawson (CI/CT, Ed: K-12, MCP) holds a bachelor's degree in Interpreting from Maryville College and has a Master's degree in Deaf Education: Educational Interpreting from the University of Tennessee. A majority of her interpreting career has been focused on educational interpreting, with over 10 years of experience in K-12 environments. She currently works at the Tennessee Schools for the Deaf serving all three campuses as Admissions Coordinator, Registrar, Attendance Supervisor, Student Information Systems Specialist, Licensure Administrator, and System Administrator for several information and assessment systems. Heather enjoys living on an old farm in Jefferson County with her husband, father-in-law, and two cats and running an Etsy store selling her crafts.
 
"Vulnerability in a Virtual World"
Saturday, June 25, 2022, 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM (EST)
Presented by Kevin Dyels
(.4 PPO CEUs, Content Level: Some)
kev
 
** Due to the nature of this workshop, there is limited capacity, but TRID will have a waitlist if it becomes necessary and can arrange for another no-cost opportunity should demand require it. Upon registering with EII, you will be sent a special registration code for this workshop.
 
Description: This workshop is an in-depth analysis into anxiety and self-confidence issues brought on by interpreting situations. Through some simple risk-taking exercises and discussions, participants learn about each other's vulnerabilities and the importance of trust as it relates to teaming and consumers. Finally, participants will learn about themselves and how to separate the human from the interpreter.
 
Kevin Dyels is the Eastern Regional Manager for Sorenson Community Interpreting. He is an owner of a performing arts interpreting company called First Chair Interpreted Productions and has held Board positions of several professional organizations. He is a professional sign language interpreter, has held managerial positions with interpreting organizations, and commits to mentoring veteran and new interpreters. Originally from northern California, Kevin presents interpreting workshops in theater, affect, team building, and self-confidence both nationally and internationally. He has traveled to India, Romania, Hong Kong, and South Africa with Quest Visual Theatre, a performance group that presents workshops and performances to deaf and hearing audiences around the world. Kevin has a degree in theater and serves as a Production Manager for Deaf Way ll. Kevin coordinates interpreters for various conferences and festivals throughout the year, works as a professional sound designer and disc jockey, and in his spare time enjoys international travel. Kevin is married to a partner from Hong Kong and they share a gray Tabby cat.
 
"Sign Safely: Healthy Bio-Mechanics and Ergonomics of Interpreting"
Saturday, June 25, 2022, 3:30 PM - 5:30 PM (EST)
Presented by Dr. Diane Gross
(.2 PS CEUs, Content Level: Some)
diane
 
Dr. Diane Gross is a Doctor of Oriental Medicine, Licensed Acupuncturist, Holistic Life Coach, and Interpreter Trainer who specializes in assisting people in healing from physical and emotional pain, as well as helping interpreters to improve their biomechanics and ergonomics. Before becoming a DOM, Dr. Gross worked as a certified sign language interpreter for more than twenty-five years in a variety of venues. She has expertise in treating overuse injury, as well as helping interpreters reduce and manage their risk of interpreting-related injury. She currently provides workshops on topics as varied as biomechanics/ergonomics, stress and vicarious trauma, acupressure, and self-massage, boosting memory and brain function, nutrition to reduce pain and stress, and consumer focused business practices.
 
In addition to her training as a Doctor of Oriental Medicine, Dr. Gross served for a number of years as executive director and workshop facilitator for a nonprofit dedicated to helping individuals learn and practice skills designed to support their emotional health. For five years she also facilitated a weekly support group for women who had experienced major emotional trauma during their lifetime. Over the years she has owned two successful companies, served as executive director for two organizations, founded and ran a non-profit and supervised hundreds of employees. She is currently in private practice in Tennessee. Dr. Gross has written several books, including Sign Safely, Interpret Intelligently: A Guide to the Prevention and Management of Interpreting-Related Injury and The Art of Personal Alchemy: Transform Your Emotional Lead into Gold, What I've Learned, and The Way of the Dandelion.